Installing the Sanity dashboard

Install the Sanity dashboard for monitoring the microservices of the Component Pack for HCL Connections.

About this task

Sanity provides a dashboard where you can monitor the health of all applications running within HCL Connections™ Component Pack. Sanity runs in its own Kubernetes pods and performs a periodic check (every 30 seconds) of all running microservices. This is useful in checking the health of individual microservices.

Procedure

  1. Install the Sanity Helm chart by running the following command:

    In the command, replace extractedFolder with the location of the directory where you extracted the Component Pack installation package. Replace the value of image.repository with the name of your Docker registry.

    
    helm install \
    --name=sanity extractedFolder/microservices_connections/hybridcloud/helmbuilds/sanity-0.1.8-20200321-160144.tgz \
    --set \
    image.repository=Docker_registry/connections,\
    logLevel=info
    Note: By default, deployment is done to the connections namespace. If you created a namespace with a different name and would like to deploy there, the following extra value must be included in the helm install command:
    namespace=namespace
  2. Install the Sanity Watcher Helm chart by running the following command:

    In the command, replace extractedFolder with the location of the directory where you extracted the Component Pack installation package. Replace the value of image.repository with the name of your Docker registry.

    
    helm install \
    --name=sanity-watcher extractedFolder/microservices_connections/hybridcloud/helmbuilds/sanity-watcher-0.1.0-20200218-182137.tgz \
    --set \
    image.repository=Docker_registry/connections
    
  3. Verify that sanity and sanity-watcher was successfully deployed.
    1. Verify that the installation completed by running the helm list command.

      When the installation completes, the chart's status shows as DEPLOYED.

    2. Run the following command to check the status of all of the pods.
      kubectl get pods -n connections
      

    For information on using the Sanity dashboard, see Using Sanity to monitor Component Pack